Wednesday, 11 July 2018

Oracle Forms Migration

This post is one of a series on what I learned while not at Kscope18.

I realise that's a month ago now, but the mind still ponders, and I've had these lined up for a while. Just got busy with a deployment, as you do. Went nice and smooth though, APEX sure does make staggered deployments easier with build options. Underrated feature. /tangent

Anyhoo - every now and then someone on the forum asks about the Oracle Forms migration tool. I've noticed it a bit recently, I guess that's a good thing.


Oracle Forms Migration. I guess what I'm learning here is that sometimes I'm a little shocked they keep at it, but I guess you've got to play the odds. And I haven't heard what was said with this slide.

I'd like to start and alternate list:

1) Setup APEX. Of course. OracleRAD will make this a breeze.

2) Create a schema that will serve as your conduit to your existing data. Privileges become additive, adding another layer to protect your data, which may include information not for the relevant APEX application.

3) Analyse what needs to change, what's broken, what's required.

Important note - workflow in a browser will be different from Oracle Forms.

While the components, capabilities, and IDE are astonishingly similar, I would never bother converting Form->Page. You'll spend more time cleaning when you could be doing more productive building.

The web universe just works different to Forms. It offers different opportunities. For instance, it's easier to build walk-through wizards for data entry. This can be important in touch device world, offering interaction with buttons instead of virtual keyboard is a plus.

Our applications now tend to generally require less keystrokes for information to be added, it's more of an interaction of buttons.

4) Import your Forms code if you must, but only for the ability to annotate existing code while you build the fresh interface. You may get better mileage by analysing straight from Oracle Forms.

The spectrum of code you'll need to ditch/refactor/keep will vary depending on the quality of the legacy application.

Continue analysis of business rules. Are they fully known? stale? Does workflow need improvement? Maybe concessions were made during the Forms development.

5) Enhance - not always necessary, but always good to add polish. But this notion of RAD? Yep, you get pretty darn good apps without even trying to add polish. And polish with a few Dynamic Actions go a long way.

And with APEX plugins, polish comes in big, free tubs. And yes, you should embrace plugins.

6) Test. Of course. And with clicky people. People who click about for the sake of clicking stuff. They're the people that are going to find those left field holes.

7) Train. While you can never replace face-to-face explanations, hopefully your application will explain itself.

8) Rollout, and enjoy applications that aren't easily obstructed as new versions of APEX arrive.
Applications that run fast, derived directly from business data, data delivered to the right people, with a natural history of who visited what and how long it took them.

We've got a keeper.

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